Canadians support tax on wealthy to fund more services: OECD survey

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In a sign that socialism is taking root in Canada, an OECD survey released recently found that 69 percent of Canadians support higher taxes on the rich more in exchange for better services from government.

That’s a slightly higher figure than the 68 per cent average for other wealthy nations surveyed by Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

The OECD surveyed 22,000 people in 21 countries, about 1,000 in a representative sample from each country. The online survey by Respondi Ltd., was performed in the spring and autumn of 2018.

People in these countries are living safer, healthier, and longer lives, and are better educated than ever before, but many fear they are falling behind and are worried about their futures, the OECD said in its commentary.

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Higher taxation of the rich has emerged as a political lightning rod in many wealthy countries, with U.S Democrats proposing hikes and “yellow vest” protesters in France demanding the wealthy bear a bigger tax burden.

In Canada, there have been calls to do more to tax money stashed in offshore accounts by wealthy investors.

About 57 per cent of Canadian respondents said they wanted government to do more to safeguard their economic and social security. Only five per cent wanted government to do less.

In Canada, many expressed worries about their financial security in retirement, and 45 per cent said they wanted increased spending on pensions, even if it means taxes rise.

In the short term, half of Canadian respondents said they struggled to meet daily expenses, with 48 per cent saying they worried about becoming ill or disabled, and 36 per cent saying they feared losing their job.

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More than half of respondents across the OECD say they do not receive their fair share of benefits given the taxes they pay, a perception that rises to three-quarters or more of respondents in more unequal countries such as Chile, Greece and Mexico. -CINEWS

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