Chemical in plastic may weaken children’s teeth irreversibly

London, May 31 (IANS) Chemicals commonly found in plastics and fungicides may be weakening children’s teeth by disrupting hormones that stimulate the growth of dental enamel, says a study.

For the study, the researchers examined the effects of two endocrine disruptors — chemicals that interfere with mammalian hormones.

Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most prevalent, found in every-day items including refillable drink bottles and food storage containers.

Vinclozolin is another endocrine disruptor that was commonly used as a fungicide in vineyards, golf courses and orchards.

The researchers from the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM) gave rats daily doses of BPA alone or in combination with vinclozolin, equivalent to an average dose a human would experience daily, from birth till they were thirty days old.

They then collected cells from the rats’ teeth surface and found that BPA and vinclozolin changed the expression of two genes controlling the mineralisation of tooth enamel.

In part two of their experiment, the team cultured and studied rat ameloblast cells, which deposit enamel during the development of teeth.

They found that the presence of sex hormones like oestrogen and testosterone boosted the expression of genes making tooth enamel, especially male sex hormones.

As BPA and vinclozolin are known to block the effect of male sex hormones, the findings reveal a potential mechanism by which endocrine disruptors could weaken teeth.

“Tooth enamel starts at the third trimester of pregnancy and ends at the age of 5, so minimising exposure to endocrine disruptors at this stage in life as a precautionary measure would be one way of reducing the risk of enamel weakening,” said study Lead Author Katia Jedeon.

The findings were presented at the 2016 European Congress of Endocrinology in Munich, Germany.

–IANS

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