Confrontation intensifies over Japan’s security bills

Tokyo, Sep 7 (IANS) Confrontation has intensified between the governing coalition and the opposition camp over the Japanese government-sponsored national security bills with less than three weeks before the current parliament session ends, the media reported on Monday.

The governing Liberal Democratic Party and its coalition partner Komeito, plan to enact the bills next week. But the largest opposition Democratic Party is seeking the cooperation of other parties to block the vote with a non-confidence motion against the government, NHK news agency reported.

The current parliament session will end in less than three weeks and Japan will have consecutive holidays in late-September.

Taking the calendar into consideration, the governing coalition is planning to put the bills to a vote in the Upper House next week and then enact them.

In order to do so, an Upper House special committee on the bills is expected to invite experts for a question-and-answer session. The governing coalition also plans to hold public hearings as soon as possible, to pave the way for a vote.

However, the Democratic Party and the Japan Innovation Party say a forcible vote on the bills is unacceptable. They plan to demand intensive deliberations with the participation of the prime minister, as well as local public hearings.

The bills would enable Japan’s Self-Defense Forces (SDF) to use arms overseas in the defence of friendly nations, a postwar precedent for Japan.

The legislation would also loosen restrictions on SDF participation in UN-led peacekeeping operations.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply