Designers give modern touch to Indian crafts for AIFW AW16 finale

New Delhi, March 21 (IANS) Nine designers, distinct visions and a myriad of stories to tell — all of this was weaved together with ‘India Modern’ theme through a kaleidoscope of colours at the finale of the Amazon India Fashion Week (AIFW) Autumn-Winter 2016 at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium here.

It laid down the final chapter of the five-day fashion saga here with names like Rahul Mishra and Samant Chauhan presenting Indian traditional craft with a contemporary twist and in a more global format.

With an aim to pay an ode to the rich heritage of India through their ensembles, the designers blended traditional craft and weaves to showcase their modern styles and sensibilities of contemporary India.

The designers splashed myriad colours on a blank canvas as they used the runway to narrate their interpretation of the ‘India Modern’ theme with a dash of innovation, creativity and experimentation.

Suits, lehengas, dresses, gowns, formal suits and skirts dominated the show.

Apart from Mishra and Chauhan, stalwarts from fashion industry like Rajesh Pratap Singh, Anju Modi, Abraham and Thakore, Rohit Gandhi and Rahul Khanna, Amit Aggarwal, Pankaj and Nidhi and Aneeth Arora came together for the finale. They presented five to six ensembles each.

With shades of indigo blues, earthy blues and greens, and whites, the show focused on Indian contemporary, fusion wear and western wear.

A surreal vibe seeped on the ramp with cylindrical lights hanging from the ceiling, adding glamour to the runway. Sticking to the theme, the show seemed like a story of India with birds and a live band plugging in the musical chords at the show.

The show commenced with a small story with the line: “It is thread of life that ties past and present together embracing the change.”

Singh, known for subtle yet fashionable lines, started the fashion party with panache. He experimented with natural indigo dying in gold colour with the outfits running high on zardozi work, linear pattern and hints of gold.

He painted a modern chapter of Indian textiles with silhouettes likes long flowy dresses and gowns.

After a formal affair with Singh’s ensembles, it was time for some casual style from Arora under her brand Pero. Her comfortable and functional outfits were backed by jackets and casual dresses with polka dots and a splash of gold.

Mishra, who has made a name with his collections at the Paris Fashion Week, told IANS that his ensembles were an “extension of what I showcased at Paris”. He played with hues of blue to bring forward artisanal evening wear like long length gown with the use of Indian textiles.

Mishra chalked out his creations with intricate embroideries, delicate work of cuts and smart detailing of hand work and prints with a bit of influence form nature as he incorporated flowers, branches, leaves to his vision as well.

The collection from the house of Abraham & Thakore took inspiration from the peasant jackets of Rajasthan and Gujarat. The “Kedia” was re-imagined as contemporary jackets and tops in earthy hues combining fine handloom mulmul with metallic highlights. It also had a sparkle of gold and shimmer with surfaces intricately worked with applique and cut-worked.

Chauhan went back to his Rajputana collection to seek inspiration, as he played with silk in its natural and raw form through the clothes. He won over the audiences with asymmetrical skirts, long jacket teamed up with trouser with work of brocade and thread work in shades of white with a hint of red.

Anju Modi used red and olive green to present ethnic collection like suits with layers, long skirts with zardozi, mirror work and hand embroidery.

Pankaj and Nidhi played with pink and white for western wear like balloon skirt, fishtail skirt, dress with long strings of threads flowing down giving a feel of a long scarf and in one a sleeve.

Known for his extravagant red carpet gowns, Aggarwal tempered with bright shades like pink, orange and red with use of sheer and ruffles.

It was ‘jharokha’ play for Gandhi and Khanna. They picked orange and red pallet for the ensemble with ‘jharokha’ prints on them.

After the finale, the designers were seen in a jovial mode as they laughed, joked and celebrated at the post show briefing, saying that “It was a great show with a perfect end. Let’s party”.

The show seemed to carry a strong deja vu feel as it reminded one of the finale of the last two editions, in which an array of designers came together to pay an ode to the rich heritage of India.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply