INDIA’S TELECOM REGULATOR GIVES 15 DAYS TO MOBILE SERVICE PROVIDERS TO ADDRESS CONCERNS

NATURAL WITH ENGLISH SPEECH

DURATION: 1:19

SOURCE: ANI

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India’s telecom regulator gives 15 days to mobile service providers to address concerns

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: THIS EDIT CONTAINS CONVERTED 4:3 MATERIAL

KEYWORDS: Telecom Regulatory Authority of India, Ravi Shankar Prasad, call drop, mobile communication, spectrum, New Delhi, Mumbai

India’s telecom regulator gives mobile service providers 15 days’ time to address call drop issues after a recent report revealed their under par performance.

SHOWS:

NEW DELHI, INDIA (SEPTEMBER 09, 2015) (ORIGINALLY 4:3) (ANI – NO ACCESS ARD)

1. CHAIRMAN OF TELECOM REGULATORY AUTHORITY OF INDIA (TRAI), R S SHARMA, SITTING

2. (SOUNDBITE) (English) CHAIRMAN OF TELECOM REGULATORY AUTHORITY OF INDIA (TRAI), R S SHARMA, SAYING:”I have told them that within one month, after 15 days we will have another drive test in the city of Mumbai and Delhi and we will also have data relating to other places because authority keeps on doing drive tests in other places also. So, we have said that we will measure whether there have been any improvement in the situation or not.”

3. SHARMA SPEAKING TO MEDIAPERSONS

4. (SOUNDBITE) (English) CHAIRMAN OF TELECOM REGULATORY AUTHORITY OF INDIA (TRAI), R S SHARMA, SAYING:”We will cross the bridge when we come to it. I mean I have no reason to disbelieve the telecom service providers and they are saying that they are making very serious honest efforts to improve the situation.”

5. SHARMA LEAVING

NEW DELHI, INDIA (SEPTEMBER 09, 2015) (ORIGINALLY 4:3) (ANI – NO ACCESS ARD)

6. (SOUNDBITE) (English) TELECOM MINISTER, RAVI SHANKAR PRASAD, SAYING:”Presently I am not thinking of any kind of penalty imposition but I don’t rule out the option if the situation doesn’t improve. Because naturally if it’s an issue, it needs to be addressed, it has to be addressed by those who are in the game.”

7. PRASAD TALKING TO MEDIAPERSONS

STORY: India’s telecom regulator on Wednesday (September 09) gave mobile service providers 15 days’ time to address call drop issues after a recent report revealed their under par performance.

Call drop means that due to technical reasons telephone calls are cut off before the speaking parties had finished their conversation and before one of them had hung up (dropped calls).

The recent drive conducted by Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) in two cities, Mumbai and Delhi, between June and July 2015 revealed that call drop rates of most of the telecom service providers exceeded the permissible limit of two percent.

“I have told them that within one month, after 15 days we will have another drive test in the city of Mumbai and Delhi and we will also have data relating to other places because authority keeps on doing drive tests in other places also. So, we have said that we will measure whether there have been any improvement in the situation or not,” said RS Sharma, TRAI chairman.

Sharma warned the telecom service providers that TRAI will “cross the bridge” if they fail to do the needful.

“We will cross the bridge when we come to it. I mean I have no reason to disbelieve the telecom service providers and they are saying that they are making very serious honest efforts to improve the situation,” said Sharma.

Separately, India’s Telecom Minister, Ravi Shankar Prasad, also did not rule out the possibility of imposing penalty in case of non-compliance.

“Presently I am not thinking of any kind of penalty imposition but I don’t rule out the option if the situation doesn’t improve. Because naturally if it’s an issue, it needs to be addressed, it has to be addressed by those who are in the game,” said Prasad.

The issue of frequent call drops has become severe in the recent months and concern has been raised by Prime Minister Narendra Modi as well in this regard.

The consumers are suffering due to a number of factors such as inadequate availability of spectrum (airwaves that carry telecom signals), sub-optimal utilisation of the available spectrum, court orders shutting down telecom towers on fears that the radiation they emit causes cancer, and lack of investments by telecom companies in new telecom towers.

India on Wednesday allowed telecom carriers to trade unused mobile airwaves, a move aimed at improving services in the world’s second-biggest market by number of mobile customers.

India’s mobile phone customer base rose 0.86 percent to touch 960.58 million this year, data released by the sector regulator showed.

The number of smartphone users in India stood at around 140 million in 2014. It is expected to reach 651 million by 2019, according to a study by Cisco.

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