It’s difficult to catch the spirit of Indian music: Dutch DJ

Candolim (Goa), Dec 30 (IANS) Dutch DJ Joris Voorn, who staged his maiden show in India at the ongoing VH1 Supersonic 2015 here, wants to take a dive into the “interesting” world of Indian music, but says getting the essence and the true spirit of the “sounds and the melodies” of Hindi music is a tough task.

He presented a sample of his house and techno style to the music aficionados on Day Two of the third edition of the four-day music carnival.

“I don’t know much about Indian music but I know that there are very passionate people organising such festivals, which is very important because they are trying to bring something in the country which is not here yet,” Voorn told IANS on the sidelines of Vh1 Supersonic 2015 here.

“But you know Indian music is very different from western music and it is difficult to really catch the spirit,” he added.

The Amsterdam-based musician, who embarked on a journey in the musical world in the 1990s as he started DJing in 1997, doesn’t rule out any plans to collaborate with Indian artists. But things get interesting when he says he would like to add tunes of Indian instrument sitar for the ‘desi’ touch.

“I do like Indian singing though I can’t name the songs. It is the singing, the sounds and the melodies that are very interesting. And one day I want to collaborate with an Indian singer. I think that would work really well or maybe do something with sitar like a lot of pop musicians have done before,” he added.

The 38-year-old earned international acclaim by taking his broken beats, house and deep soulful techno on a foreign tour. He has performed across Europe, Asia, North and South America. Now India is the new entrant in the long list.

He asserts that internet acts like a vestibule for music to travel across borders.

“Music is a global thing and I guess that is what brings to me a place like India because people have already heard my music on the web,” Voorn said.

“The internet has made everything different because music can be streamed and heard anywhere. Like something made in the North Pole can be heard in the South Pole, something made in Amsterdam can be heard in Delhi and Goa. It is not restricted any more,” added Voorn, who came out with his first album back in early 2000s.

Quiz him about the Indian crowd and Voorn is quick to note that “it is like people are celebrating something by getting together and listening to music”.

But his mind was also shrouded with doubts over what to include in the playlist and what to skip before coming to India.

“It was the first time and I didn’t know what to expect. But people here are very open to music and know what they like. They recognized some of the bigger tracks, in that sense I don’t think I had to play easy,” he said.

It was not only his first performance in the country but Voorn’s first trip to India as well. And the musician rues that he missed the chance to explore the “real India” and vows to return soon.

“To be honest, to be coming to India and kind of being here (festival venue) and the hotel, I don’t think I have seen the real India. I think real India is very colourful and spiritual and I hope to see that a bit more,” he said.

“All the things I saw here were tourist jobs and that is not what I want to come to India for. I would want to come to India ten times in a year, but let’s just try to come one or two times.”

(The writer’s trip is at the invitation of Viacom18 Media Pvt. Ltd. Sugandha Rawal can be contacted at

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