Capturing the millennial vote is preoccupation of every political party in the country. A new report by Future Majority, an NGO casts some light on this subject.

It found that those between 18 and 35 have a few issues that will make or break whether a party will have their support. It also suggested that just 27 per cent of youth voters would consider voting for any party.

The report found 82 per cent of young Canadians refuse to support a party that doesn’t commit to reducing the country’s carbon emissions. Sixty-two per cent of respondents said they’d consider voting for the Conservatives, but that failing to reduce carbon emissions would be a top deal-breaker issue for them.

A range of other hot-button social issues like LGBT and Indigenous rights are important to young voters.

Those issues are followed by concerns about the health-care system. Any talk of reducing spending on health issues by any party will have immediate consequences- millennials won’t vote for that party.

Eighty-one per cent would deny their vote to a party that compromised a woman’s right to choose. Seventy-seven per cent would not support a party that reduced funding for post-secondary education.

With millennials and Gen-Z now making up the country’s largest voting block, political parties are paying attention and ensuring that their message is carefully crafted around the issues that could likely drain vital support from this voting block and cost them elections in the years to come.

Among young voters, the NDP was the most popular party with 88 per cent of those surveyed saying they would consider voting for them. They were followed by the Liberals at 87 per cent, the Green Party at 79 per cent and the Conservatives at 47 per cent.

Many of those surveyed expressed frustration with recent changes to Ontario’s student loans program under Premier Doug Ford’s provincial government as part of their responses.

Future Majority, a non-partisan organization, defines itself as a group of young Canadians that aims to “address the growing disconnect young Canadians feel from the country’s current politics and politicians.” In its report, the organization surveyed more than 1,000 youth voters from ridings that have historically been decided by close vote margins, including Kitchener-Conestoga, Regina Wascana and Saskatoon West.

Unless this young voting block becomes more flexible in their thinking as they age, politicians may be forced to pursue policy that may sound good to millennials but could cause irreparable long-term damage to the economy.

oman’s right to choose. 77 per cent would not support a party that reduced funding for post-secondary education.
With millennials and Gen-Z now making up the country’s largest voting block, political parties are paying attention and ensuring that their message is carefully crafted around the issues that could likely drain vital support from this voting block and cost them elections in the years to come.
Among young voters, the NDP was the most popular party with 88 per cent of those surveyed saying they would consider voting for them. They were followed by the Liberals at 87 per cent, the Green Party at 79 per cent and the Conservatives at 47 per cent.
Many of those surveyed expressed frustration with recent changes to Ontario’s student loans program under Premier Doug Ford’s provincial government as part of their responses.
Future Majority, a non-partisan organization, defines itself as a group of young Canadians that aims to “address the growing disconnect young Canadians feel from the country’s current politics and politicians.” In its report, the organization surveyed more than 1,000 youth voters from ridings that have historically been decided by close vote margins, including Kitchener-Conestoga, Regina Wascana and Saskatoon West.
Unless this young voting block becomes more flexible in their thinking as they age, politicians may be forced to pursue policy that may sound good to millennials but could cause irreparable long-term damage to the economy.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here