Two new long-term care homes will be built in Oakville and are expected to open in Oakville sometime around 2025.

Long-term Care Minister Rod Phillips announced the new homes will provide modern, safe, and comfortable places to live for 640 residents, and will offer culturally appropriate services to members of the Hindu and Sikh communities.

The province has signed a conditional agreement of purchase and sale with Schlegel Villages Inc. for 2165 Dundas Street West in Oakville, adjacent to Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital for the project. These new homes are part of the Ford government’s initiative to sell unused government land on the condition that a portion of the site be used for long-term care.

“Our government is fixing Ontario’s long-term care system and building new homes like the two that will be built on this site, is a key part of our plan,” said Minister Phillips. “Our government’s initiative to sell unused provincial lands will allow more seniors to stay in their community, close to family and friends, while getting the care they need.”

“Our community is thankful for the province’s commitment to long-term care in our town,” said Oakville Mayor Rob Burton. “For many years there has been a growing need for long-term care in Oakville to support our aging and diverse population. The long-term care beds in North Oakville will lower the wait time for patients that need a more permanent home and will also free up hospital beds for acute patients.”

The province is also planning to build a long-term care home in Vaughan. The new facility, which is expected to open by 2026, will accommodate 256 residents and will offer culturally appropriate services to members of the Italian community.

The Ontario government has signed a conditional agreement of purchase and sale with Arch Vaughan Facility Inc. for a portion of 7231 Martin Grove Road in Vaughan for this project.

Leveraging surplus provincial lands is part of the province’s ongoing work to fix the long-term care sector. 

As of May 2021, more than 38,000 people were on the waitlist to access a long-term care bed in Ontario. The median wait time is 171 days for applicants to be placed in long-term care.

The sale of this surplus government land is expected to be finalized in early 2022.

 

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